Energy efficiency is not just low-hanging fruit; it is fruit on the ground. Stephen Chu, US Secretary of Energy
  • Here is presentation given by Dutch consultants on the 29th January. Growers who attended this event heard how the drive to save energy, and to grow more sustain-ably, was seeing fundamental changes to glasshouse cropping practices in the Netherlands.
  • A presentation given by Farm Energy Centre's Tim Pratt at the TGA's 2013 Conference, on 26th September.
  • Common practice is to put measuring boxes in a position that is both practically convenient and which provides representative measurements of the conditions in the greenhouse.
  • Reducing minimum pipe temperature settings is a good way to save energy. However, this must be done alongside well considered ventilation settings to ensure that heating requirements are minimised.
  • When growing greenhouse crops, it’s sometimes desirable to use a little more heat than strictly necessary to maintain adequate growing conditions. The purpose of this is to keep conditions comfortably away from those which could, for instance, trigger a disease problem.
  • Because supplementary lights also produce heat, they can have a sudden impact on the temperature balance of a greenhouse when they are turned on.
  • What are the energy implications of using ‘pre-night’ or ‘drop’? ‘Pre-night’ is a technique used by some edible crop growers who believe that a rapid drop in greenhouse temperature just before sunset helps crop development.
  • In our article 'Where should you position your measuring box?', we showed how relying on a measuring box placed in the traditional position at the top of a tomato crop can give non-optimised control of the greenhouse environment and lead to wasted energy.