Energy efficiency is not just low-hanging fruit; it is fruit on the ground. Stephen Chu, US Secretary of Energy
  • At the end of February 2014, twenty growers and horticultural industry professionals from the UK visited Ontario and British Columbia on a greenhouse horticulture study tour, organised by the GrowSave team. The group visited 14 organisations which comprised of nurseries, R&D facilities and industry suppliers.
  • There is increasing evidence that using diffuse light within a greenhouse can give production advantages, such as an increase in yields and reduced time to market, as well as quality improvement.
  • Here is presentation given by Dutch consultants on the 29th January. Growers who attended this event heard how the drive to save energy, and to grow more sustain-ably, was seeing fundamental changes to glasshouse cropping practices in the Netherlands.
  • Controlling humidity can be expensive in energy terms, yet it is essential for the control of fungal disease and to ensure active plant growth. Humidity control also needs to be carefully targeted so as not to negate the energy savings from measures such as temperature integration (TI) and thermal screens.
  • In 2008, the GrowSave team worked with tomato growers R & L Holt to optimise the use of thermal screens at their Hornsfield Nursery. The end result was best practice energy use levels and enhanced crop yield.
  • The graph below shows energy use over the course of a day in February at R&L Holts (one of the GrowSave Focus Nurseries). It is a perfect illustration of how things should operate when a thermal screen is set up correctly!
  • In our article 'Optimising screen and vent control with lights',  we explained the importance of gapping when
  • The use of thermal screens has become common place on many edible crop nurseries. They've been shown to save large amount of energy, paying back their cost quickly. In 2005, HDC project PC 198 showed that a thermal screen could save 100 kWh/m2 p.