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Energy efficiency is not just low-hanging fruit; it is fruit on the ground. Stephen Chu, US Secretary of Energy

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  • Avoiding condensation on plants is a key part of any disease control strategy. Poinsettia growers have to pay particular attention to this problem as they use a technique to control plant height called ‘Drop’. ‘Drop’ involves reducing the greenhouse temperature to as low as 12 degrees C before sunrise and is followed by an increase in the greenhouse temperature to the daytime set point within one hour after sunrise. Read More...
  • The use of thermal screens has become common place on many edible crop nurseries. They've been shown to save large amount of energy, paying back their cost quickly. In 2005, HDC project PC 198 showed that a thermal screen could save 100 kWh/m2 p. Read More...
  • In this factsheet, Farm Energy Centre's Chris Plackett, and Steve Adams and Allen Langton from Warwick Horticultural Research International (HRI) outline how efficient thermal screens can save energy in glasshouse production without adversely affecting yield or quality. Read More...
  • In this factsheet, Farm Energy Centre's Chris Plackett, and Steve Adams and Allen Langton from Warwick Horticultural Research International (HRI) highlight the energy savings that can be made through effective glasshouse temperature.   Summary points:   Reducing the heating set-point by 1°C can typically save around 10–13% energy. Read More...
  • Click to see a larger version                   The greenhouse temperature dropped pretty quickly and the screen closed. The end result was a lower pipe temperature than before the screen closed and a warmer greenhouse. Read More...