A nation that can't control its energy sources can't control its future. Barack Obama
  • At the end of February 2014, twenty growers and horticultural industry professionals from the UK visited Ontario and British Columbia on a greenhouse horticulture study tour, organised by the GrowSave team. The group visited 14 organisations which comprised of nurseries, R&D facilities and industry suppliers.
  • Here is presentation given by Dutch consultants on the 29th January. Growers who attended this event heard how the drive to save energy, and to grow more sustain-ably, was seeing fundamental changes to glasshouse cropping practices in the Netherlands.
  • A presentation given by Farm Energy Centre's Tim Pratt at the TGA's 2013 Conference, on 26th September.
  • Using heat to control humidity in a greenhouse gives the advantages of a good yielding and a disease-free crop. But with energy prices rising, many growers are left wondering whether humidity control is something they can really afford.
  • Common practice is to put measuring boxes in a position that is both practically convenient and which provides representative measurements of the conditions in the greenhouse.
  • Avoiding condensation on plants is a key part of any disease control strategy. Poinsettia growers have to pay particular attention to this problem as they use a technique to control plant height called ‘Drop’. ‘Drop’ involves reducing the greenhouse temperature to as low as 12 degrees C before sunrise and is followed by an increase in the greenhouse temperature to the daytime set point within one hour after sunrise.
  • Reducing minimum pipe temperature settings is a good way to save energy. However, this must be done alongside well considered ventilation settings to ensure that heating requirements are minimised.
  • In recent years, the accepted norm for growers of edible crops such as tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers has been to control humidity based on humidity deficit (HD). This is because conventional wisdom suggests that maintaining a minimum HD promotes transpiration, which, in turn, ensures optimised plant development and growth.