Energy efficiency is not just low-hanging fruit; it is fruit on the ground. Stephen Chu, US Secretary of Energy
  • In our article 'Optimising screen and vent control with lights',  we explained the importance of gapping when
  • The graph below shows energy use over the course of a day in February at R&L Holts (one of the GrowSave Focus Nurseries). It is a perfect illustration of how things should operate when a thermal screen is set up correctly!
  • Variable speed electric drives (VSDs) enable what are otherwise fixed speed motors to operate a range of speeds and torques from zero to 100%. They can give great process flexibility, reduce wear and tear on machines, and dramatically cut running costs.
  • Boilers may have to be operated at times when no heat is required, so that CO2 can be produced.  The rate of production is dependant on the firing level of the boiler. Two of the simpler set points available for managing CO2 enrichment are maximum boiler capacity for CO2 and minimum boiler capacity for CO2.
  • Common sense tells us that eliminating unnecessary venting will save energy. However, putting this theory into practice is not as simple as it sounds, especially when humidity control is a key requirement.
  • Horticultural businesses benefit from a rebate on the duty paid on fuel oils, whether to heat a building or growing medium, as long as it is used to grow produce.
  • The use of thermal screens has become common place on many edible crop nurseries. They've been shown to save large amount of energy, paying back their cost quickly. In 2005, HDC project PC 198 showed that a thermal screen could save 100 kWh/m2 p.
  • Similar to the Feed-in Tariffs for renewable electricity, the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is aimed at significantly increasing the proportion of heat generated from renewable sources. It is a commitment by the government to long-term financial support, paying a fixed amount per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of heat produced over a 20-year term, adjusted each year for inflation.